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Biography 2001


• 1989 • 1990 • 1991 • 1992 • 1993 • 1994 •  1995 •  1996 •  1997 •  1998 •  1999 • 2000 •  2001 •  2002 •  2003 •  2004 •  2005 •  2006Biography 1991-2001

January saw a winding down of any Cranberries activities as Dolores approached her due date. And on Saturday afternoon, January 27th, Dolores gave birth to her second child – a healthy baby girl called Molly. A double celebration as Molly’s birth date falls on the same date as Dolores’s husband, Don.

Remarkably Dolores was on her feet within a matter of days. And so plans for recording Part 2 of the band’s new album look set to stay on schedule.

Just over a month after the birth, the Cranberries brought their own new “baby” into the world with the launch of a new web service. This is the third version of the Official Cranberries Web Service.

October 2001 saw the release of the Cranberries 5th studio album, entitled “Wake Up And Smell The Coffee”.

Below is the official MCA Records biography being used to promote “Wake Up And Smell The Coffee” worldwide.

Have you got a moment? That simple query lies at the heart of the Cranberries’ WAKE UP AND SMELL THE COFFEE, the Irish band’s sublime MCA Records debut and first new album in two years. Over the past decade, the Cranberries have sold millions of records and won fans around the world thanks to their tight arrangements, inerrant melodic instincts, probing songs and, especially, the crystalline vocals of Dolores O’Riordan. Now celebrating their 10th anniversary, the Cranberries have got it down, and with their new album they make an earnest, tuneful plea to seize the day while cherishing every moment of life.

In some ways, WAKE UP AND SMELL THE COFFEE is a homecoming. The album was produced in Dublin by Stephen Street (The Smiths, Morrissey, Blur), producer of the band’s first two albums. Says Dolores, “There’s a sense of stability Stephen brings to this band. He used to be so paternal when he first worked with us, and he’d talk to me like I was one of his kids. This time, our relationship is more mutual.” Adds drummer Fergal Lawler, “It was great to be with him again. Stephen really understands us and gets the best from every one of us.” Indeed, the new album radiates a deep contentment the band members feel in their lives today, both personally and professionally. “This is the calmest we’ve ever been,” says Dolores. “We’ve proven ourselves by now, so we’re really relaxed and really enjoyed ourselves in the studio, totally going with the flow.”

Songs like the muted “Never Grow Old” and the premiere single “Analyse” capture the struggle between head and heart, while appreciating life’s simpler joys. “There was a point in the last year or so when I finally saw the beauty I had been blind to for so long,” notes Dolores. “These songs say ‘don’t stress worrying about tomorrow, next week, next year, when there’s so much beauty around.’” The haiku-like “Pretty Eyes” has a winsome 60’s feel, while “Time is Ticking Out” shows that the Cranberries still retain all the turbulent political fury of albums past. The languid “Dying Inside,” which describes the steady corruption of a soul, contrasts sharply with unabashed love songs like “The Concept” and “I Really Hope.” The slow waltz “Carry On” and “Do You Know” both celebrate the life-force, while the harder-rocking title track throws new light on an old saying. The album closes with the hauntingly personal “Chocolate Brown,” cut live with one microphone. “A few songs on the album have different vibes from anything we’ve done before,” notes Mike. “It’s nice to do different things, though it’s not something we plan. It just happens naturally.”

Taking that organic approach has been a hallmark of the Cranberries since first forming in their hometown of Limerick, Ireland. The 80’s had produced a bumper crop of Irish stars, including U2, Clannad, Enya, Hot House Flowers, and Sinead O’Connor. In 1989, the Hogan brothers, along with friends Fergal Lawler and singer Niall Quinn, sought to emulate their countrymen/heroes. Initially calling themselves the Cranberry Saw Us, the rowdy band ultimately coalesced when Dolores replaced Quinn sometime after the band had played a few gigs. Early demos drew the attention of Island Records’ Chris Blackwell and top producer Denny Cordell (Leon Russell, Tom Petty), which led to their first major record deal.

In 1992, the Cranberries released their multi-platinum debut Everybody Else Is Doing It, So Why Can’t We? The 1993 single “Linger” reached the American Top 10, with the album selling over a million copies in North America and, following a re-release, debuting at #1 on the U.K. charts (after failing to climb above #75 initially). Their second album No Need To Argue (1994) sold 12 million copies in its first year of release, propelled by the hit single “Zombie,” while their 1996 third album To The Faithful Departed, produced by Bruce Fairbairn (Aerosmith, Bon Jovi, AC/DC) reaped additional gold and platinum for the band. More than anything, fans and critics were charmed by the Cranberries’ no-frills style. “We learned early on that less is more,” says Noel. “If you fill up all the empty space, then there’s no room for the music to breathe, especially given the kind of singer Dolores is.”



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8.03.2010 |
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